Download A History of Greece, Volume 2 of 8, originally published in by Connop Thirlwall PDF

By Connop Thirlwall

This is often the second one of 8 volumes at the heritage of Greece, first released in 1836. The volumes have been geared toward audiences: these those that sought after greater than a superficial wisdom of the topic, yet didn't have the time or potential to check the unique assets, and those that had entry to the traditional authors, yet required a advisor or interpreter. the second one quantity considers the background of Attica to the expulsion of the Pisistratids, the Greek colonies, the development of paintings and literature, the affairs of the Asiatic Greeks to 512 BCE, and occasions from the accession of Darius to the battles of Marathon and Salamis. the ultimate bankruptcy takes the historical past to the top of the Persian invasion. This booklet can be of curiosity to researchers and scholars of historical historical past.

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Ii. p. , thinks that he meant to reduce the value of the drachm only by one quarter, but that the new coin proved lighter than was expected. CHAP. XI. CIVIL HISTORY OP ATTICA. 35 which it involved. Finally he abolished the inhuman law, which enabled the creditor to enslave his debtor, and restored those who were pining at home in such, bondage to immediate liberty ; and it would seem that he compelled those who had sold their debtors into foreign countries to procure their freedom at their own expense.

P. 240. 0,2 20 HISTORY OF GREECE. CHAP. XI. grounded judgment on the degree in which equity may have been violated by his indiscriminate rigour; for though we read that he enacted the same capital punishment for petty thefts as for sacrilege and murder, still as there were some offences for which he provided a milder sentence ] , he must have framed a kind of scale, the wisdom and justice of which we have no means of estimating. The danger which threatened the nobles at length showed itself from a side on which they probably deemed themselves most secure.

XI. CIVIL HISTORY OP ATTICA. 35 which it involved. Finally he abolished the inhuman law, which enabled the creditor to enslave his debtor, and restored those who were pining at home in such, bondage to immediate liberty ; and it would seem that he compelled those who had sold their debtors into foreign countries to procure their freedom at their own expense. The debt itself in such cases was of course held to be extinguished. Solon himself, in a poem which he afterwards composed on the subject of his legislation, spoke with a becoming pride of the happy change which this measure had wrought in the face of Attica, of the numerous citizens whose lands he had discharged, and whose persons he had emancipated, and brought back from hopeless slavery in strange lands.

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